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A Syrian Love Story

Sean McAllister

2015

Is it love for another person or love for your country which gives us the greatest sense of belonging?

Comrades and lovers Amer and Raghda met in a Syrian prison. 15 years and 4 children later, Award-winning director Sean McAllister follows the family over 5 years, as the Arab Spring sweeps the region.The film charts their incredible odyssey to political freedom, documenting their dreams and despair: for the revolution, their homeland and each other.

A Woman Captured

Bernadett Tuza-Ritter

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can Freedom ever be more frightening than enslavement? A Woman Captured is a raw and intimate portrayal of the psychology behind enslavement. Award-winning Director Bernadett Tuza-Ritter offers an evocative study of a woman so debased and disregarded that even she has lost sight of her own life. As a close friendship develops between the captured woman (Marish) and the filmmaker, Marish’s confidence is slowly restored as she begins to imagine a different life for herself. With this new found sense of confidence, will A Woman Captured ever be able to escape the unbearable oppression to become a free woman?

Advice to Men

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes give advice to men about how they can be allies in the fight for gender equality.

At Home in the World

Andreas Koefoed

2015

What impact does the Danish asylum system have on families seeking refugee status?

This Film follows 10-year-old Magomed an asylum seeker from Chechnya, as he adjusts to life in Denmark. . But his new life with new friends takes on a dark and heartbreaking turn when the decision about the family’s application for asylum comes with both good and bad news.

BBC World Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Why does poverty persist in today's world of extreme wealth?

The BBC World Debate is part of a global event hosted by the BBC and 50 other broadcasters around the world. The debate explores the causes of and cures for the enduring problem of severe poverty which still affects many people in the world. The panel is made up of: Tony Blair, former UK Prime Minister; Oby Ezekwesili from the Open Society Foundation in Africa and a former Nigerian government minister; Moeltesi Mbeki, South African author and Chair of SA Institute of International Affairs; and Vandana Shiva, Indian activist, environmentalist and scientist. The debate was chaired by Zeinab Badawi.

Bastards

Deborah Perkin

2014

How do the mothers' of illegitimate children battle social stigma in a country where sex outside of marriage is illegal?

In Morocco, as in all Muslim countries, sex outside marriage is illegal and women bear the brunt of society’s disapproval. But what is the fate of the children of those single mothers? They are denied jobs, housing and condemned to a life of discrimination. Bastards is the first film to tell this story from a mother’s point of view.

Big Men

Rachel Boynton

2013

After the discover of oil, will Ghana manage to avoid becoming the latest resource-cursed African country?

Big Men is an epic adventure of high-stakes capitalism, with shockingly intimate access to company executives, government officials and gun-toting militants. Kosmos Energy, a Dallas-based oil company, discovers Ghana’s first oil. Can they develop the field and maximize profits as everyone involved tries to gain as much as possible?

Biggest Chinese Restaurant in the World

Weijun Chen

2008

What does life at the world's biggest Chinese restaurant reveal about the state of modern China?

The proprietress, the bridegroom- to-be and the young waitress. Through the eyes of the staff and guests of the world’s biggest Chinese restaurant, we gain a unique picture of modern China.

Bloody Cartoons

Karsten Kjaer

2007

What do Danish cartoons tell us about contemporary democracy?

Bloody Cartoons is a documentary about how and why drawings in a Danish provincial paper could whirl a small country into a confrontation with Muslims all over the world. He asks whether respect for Islam combined with the heated response to the cartoons is now leading us towards self-censorship. How tolerant should we be of the intolerant? And what limits should there be, if any, to freedom of speech in a democracy?

Campaign! The Kawasaki Candidate

Kazuhiro Soda

2007

Can a candidate with no political experience and no charisma win an election with the backing of influential people?

In the fall of 2005, 40-year-old, self-employed Kazuhiko "Yama-san" Yamauchi's peaceful, humdrum life was turned upside-down. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) had suddenly chosen him as its official candidate to run for a vacant seat on the Kawasaki city council. Yama-san had zero experience in politics, no charisma, no supporters, no constituency, and no time to prepare for the impending election. The election was critical for the LDP. Adhering to the campaign tactic of "bowing to everybody, even to telephone poles," Yama-san visits local festivals, kindergarten sports events, senior gatherings, commuter train stations, and even bus stops to offer his hand to every one he sees. Can Yama-san win this heated race? Through its candid, cinema-verite style camerawork, this rare, detailed documentary of a Japanese election reveals the true nature of "democracy."

Coach Zoran & His African Tigers

Sam Benstead

2014

Will Coach Zoran unite South Sudan through its first ever national football team?

South Sudan became an independent state in July 2011, following al- most 50 years of civil war. This film follows veteran Serbian coach Zoran Djordjevic as he seeks to forge the first national football team in the new country.

Colours in the Dust

Jonathan Stack, Massena "Bougon" Cesar, Huguens Saintil, Jean Peirre Belony & Nicolas Cuellar

2012

Can creativity help Haiti rebuild after the earthquake?

Ten-year-old Jouvens Latour survives Haiti's earthquake, but amidst the suffering, poverty turns into possibility. The young artist believes creativity is the way forward for his country.

Coming of Age

Judy Kibinge

2007

What does democracy look like through a child's eyes?

The film depicts the three stages of democracy as seen through the eyes of a girl growing up in Kenya. The Kenyatta Era was a time of great optimism and post-independence euphoria. It was followed by the era of dictatorship under Daniel arap Moi, and finally the ushering in of a third president, Mwai Kibaki. But after the disputed election results in December 2007 and the resultant violent civil strife and the death of hundreds, we are left wondering if democracy can ever truly come of age.

Crown Princess Mary’s Mission

Line Johansen & Helle Slejborg

2016

What can HRH Crown Princess Mary learn from the women she meets in Burkina Faso and Senegal?

In this film we venture with HRH Crown Princess Mary, when she visits the poverty-stricken West-African nation of Burkina Faso. Here, she joins the efforts of local women to gain the right to self-determination over their own bodies. We also revisit HRH’s visit to Senegal last year, where she was involved in the campaign against Female genital mutilation – a painful practice causing harm to millions of women in Africa and some parts of Asia. She reveals the details of her work in the struggle for women’s rights and for empowering disenfranchised women across the globe.

DR Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Does foreign aid help or hinder the eradication of poverty?

Dancing Boys of Afghanistan

Najibullah Quraishi

2010

How is the fight against the Taliban contributing to the exploitation of young boys in Afghanistan?

In Southern Afghanistan hundreds of boys as young as 10, living in extreme poverty, are lured off the streets on the promise of a new life away from destitution, unaware their real fate is to be used for entertainment and sex.

Detropia

Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady

2012

What can the stories of people in Detroit tell us about the evolution of American identity?

An owner of a blues bar, a young blogger, an auto union rep, a group of young artists, an opera impresario and a gang of illegal “scrappers” make up an unlikely chorus that illuminates the tale of both a city and a country in a soul-searching mood, desperate for a new identity.

Dissapeared by the IRA

Alison Millar

2013

What do you do when your mother suddenly disappears and never comes back?

The powerful story of those killed and then secretly buried by the IRA during the conflict in Northern Ireland.

Don't Shoot

Lucilla Blankenberg

2007

What are the secret to success of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader?

Riaan Cruywagen has been reading the news on television since it arrived in South Africa in 1976. He prides himself in the nickname, "The face of news in South Africa" and his record of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader in the world. In the context of South Africa's spectacular transformation to democracy, Riaan explains how his professional ethics have kept him in the news readers seat.

Education, Education

Weijun Chen

2012

Can a good education provide an escape from poverty?

“In China, the most lucrative Industry is Education.” Wang Zhenxiang, Tutor, Hongbo Education. There is a worldwide economic crisis, but everywhere parents are told that their children may escape the worst if they are educated, and everywhere children are pressured to climb the rungs of the ladder and acquire the totem of middle class life – a university education. But does education secure what it is supposed to? Can a degree really get you out of poverty? Weijun Chen’s film, set in Wuhan in central China, looks at the realities of Chinese education through the lives of Wang Zhenxiang, a tutor at the private Hongbo Education college, Wang Pan, high school graduate and would be student, and Wan Chao, graduate job seeker who goes from one unpromising interview to another.

Egypt: We are watching you

Leila Menjou & Sherief Fahmy

2007

What role can ordinary citizens play in shaping democracy in Egypt?

In his 2005 State of the Union address President George W. Bush cites Egypt as the country that will pave the way for democracy in the Middle East. Three women, unable to sit by while their country is on the brink of drastic change, start a grassroots movement to educate and empower the public by raising awareness about the meaning of democracy. They name their campaign Shayfeen.com, which means to “we are watching you.” This film follows the highs and lows of the first year of the movement in Egypt. Insisting that only the people can make change happen, their goal is to educate the Egyptian public on what it takes to build the most basic pillars of democracy: demanding basic human rights, freedom of speech and the establishment of an independent judiciary. Egypt: We are Watching You shows the role ordinary citizens can play in shaping and securing their democracy.

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute

Robin Glass

2016

A film about girls' and women's family planning

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute makes the urgent case for widespread and safe access to contraceptive services. Access to these services is considered vital for reducing ¼ of all maternal deaths and for establishing women’s right to decide how they want to live their lives. 

Facts of Life

Hapetnak Sarkisyan

2016

A film about health services worldwide

Facts of Life uses stark comparison to illustrate health inequality between countries. Highlighting the bleakness of such startling disparity, the narrator compels the audience to be a part of changing these Facts.

Famous Last Words

Avril Evans

2007

What effect did the 7/7 London Bombings have on local's attitude to foreign integration?

In an environment of imminent terrorist threat, this film unravels the complex attitudes people have towards ethnic minorities and the anxieties both parties have suffered since the London bombings of 7/7/05. Misconceptions and stereotypes persist as we follow one woman on her route to a job interview and the silent hostilities ash encounters as a Muslim.

Female Rolemodel

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes talk about their female role models. 

Feminine, Masculine

Sadaf Foroughi

2007

Can changing Tehran's sexist segregation on buses have a wider impact on gender equality across Iran?

In the male dominated society of Iran, Farahnaz Shiri, the first female bus driver in Tehran, has made her own little society in her bus. In Iran there are different sections for men and women on public buses. But in Mrs. On Shiri's bus, everything is vice versa. In her bus, women are made to feel empowered and enjoy the privilege of freely debating their position in Iranian society. Mrs. Shiri's struggle to prove herself in this society provides a fascinating insight into gender and power in the close space of a public bus.

Finding Josephine

Tomas Sheridan

2012

Who really benefits from charitable donations?

A family has been supporting a child in Uganda via a charity for three years. The father and small daughter travel from UK to Uganda to see if their charity makes any difference: to them or to the child they are supporting.

First to Fall

Rachel Beth Anderson & Timothy Grucza

2013

Can two men from Russia become part of the Libyan revolution?

In 2011 two friends abandon their peace of their home country to fight in the Libyan revolution. Driven by their hatred of Muammar Gaddafi and a desire to be a part of history.

For God, the Tsar and the Fatherland

Nino Kirtadze

2007

Can life in Russia's 'village of fools' make you more patriotic?

Mikhail Morozov is a Russian patriot, good Christian and successful businessman. He owns Durakovo – the “Village of Fools” – 100 km southwest of Moscow. People come here from all over Russia to learn how to live and become true Russians. When they join the Village of Fools, the new residents abandon all their former rights and agree to obey Mikhail Morozov’s strict rules. he whole spectrum of state power – political, spiritual and administrative – gather in the village for semi-private meetings with Morozov. They discuss the future of Russia, their ambitions and their goals. For God, Tsar and Fatherland shows what drives Russian patriotism today and why they are against democracy.

Gay in Uganda: Call me Kuchu

Malika Zouhali-Worrall & Kathrine Fairfax Wright

2012

How can LGBT people survive in a country where homosexuality is illegal?

The last year in the life of veteran activist David Kato, as he labours to repeal Uganda’s homophobic laws and liberate his fellow lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender men and women, or “kuchus”.

Gideon's Army

Dawn Porter

2013

Is it possible to reform the US criminal justice system to realize "justice for all"?

Gideon's Army follows Travis Williams, Brandy Alexander and June Hardwick, three young public defenders who are part of a small group of idealistic lawyers in the Deep South challenging the assumptions that drive a criminal justice system strained to the breaking point. Can these courageous lawyers revolutionize the way America thinks about indigent defence and make “justice for all” a reality?

Girl Model

David Redmon & A. Sabin

2012

Is being a girl model as glamorous as it seems?

Girl Model follows two protagonists involved in this industry: Ashley, a deeply ambivalent model scout who scours the Siberian countryside looking for fresh faces to send to the Japanese market, and one of her discoveries, Nadya, a thirteen year-old plucked from the Siberian countryside and dropped into the center of Tokyo with promises of a profitable career.

Give us the Money

Bosse Lindquist

2012

Can glitz and celebrity save the world?

Thirty years ago, rock stars Bob Geldof and Bono set out on a journey to fight poverty in Africa. They tried to convince some of the wiliest and mightiest politicians on earth to change the world. Give us the Money tracks their journey through famines and palaces, and world-wide TV-audiences. But how successful have they really been? Did they manage to make the world a better place? Bosse Lindquist's film tracks the history of this idea. "A band of musicians set out to change the world" he says "and now the time has come to ask: What did they achieve, and is celebrity politics is the right way of combating world poverty?"'

God Loves Uganda

Roger Ross Williams

2013

How is the American Evangelical movement fuelling Uganda's turn towards violent homophobia?

Academy Award-winning Filmmaker Roger Ross Williams explores the role of the American Evangelical movement in fueling Uganda’s terrifying turn towards biblical law and the proposed death penalty for homosexuality. . Shocking and enlightening, touching and horrifying, God Loves Uganda will leave you questioning just how closely this brand of Christianity resembles the one you think you know.

Holiday from Poverty

Jez Lewis

2012

What does it mean to take take a holiday - when you've never had one?

Poor families might not be starving in the UK, but in a culture where most people have more than you, being poor is isolating and shaming, "People look down on you for being poor." This personal film looks at the huge difference just having a holiday can make to a family living in poverty. "They don't want money, they just want their dignity back."

I was a Yazidi slave

David Evans

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can there be justice after genocide, sexual violence and slavery? In August 2014, an Islamic State massacre of unimaginable proportions took place during the rapid invasion of the Yazidi people in Sinjar, northern Iraq. Young Yazidi women were separated from the old and taken to the Galaxy Cinema in Mosul. There they were paraded, selected, enslaved, tortured and systematically raped. Some were only 11 years old. I was a Yazidi slave follows the Yazidi women’s journey to recovery and ask how a survivor of unthinkable sexual violence can find justice and a path to rehabilitation.

I will be Murdered

Justin Webster

2013

How can a dead man assist in the investigation of his own murder?

In May 2009, Rodrigo Rosenberg, a wealthy, charismatic lawyer went cycling near his home in Guatemala City and was murdered. What was extraordinary is that Rosenberg knew, for certain, he was about to be killed. A brilliant investigation, a journey into Rosenberg’s soul and Guatemala’s hell, that after multiple twists and turns, reached a stunning revelation.

If you would give one piece of advice to men - what would it be?

2016

If you were to give one piece of advice to men– what would it be?

In Search of Ghandi

Lalit Vachani

2007

Can Ghandi's influence still be found in the modern India: the world's largest democracy?

In the early decades of the twentieth century Mahatma Gandhi’s legacy of non-violent revolution or Satyagraha inspired a mass movement of millions of Indians to rise up against the British colonial state and successfully agitate for the establishment of a democratic and free India. In 007, the country is preparing to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of its existence as an independent nation. But what kind of a democracy does India have today? What does it actually mean to live in the world’s largest democracy? In road-movie style the film crew travels down the famous trail of Gandhi’s salt march, the remarkable mass campaign that galvanized ordinary Indians to join the non-violent struggle for democracy and freedom almost a century ago. Stopping at the same villages and cities, where Gandhi and his followers had raised their call for independence, the film documents the stories of ordinary citizens in India today. Although inspired by a historical event In Search of Gandhi is not a journey back in time. Instead, it is a search for the present and future of democracy in India.

In Your Hands

Lucas Nieto

2012

If you lived in the 11th most violent city in the world, what path would your life take?

Cali in Colombia is the 11th most violent city in the world. Homicide levels are high and more than 40% of the city's murders take place in the district of Aguablanca. In a place where violence is so rife and where gang membership is a way of defending your neighbourhood, what path would you take if you lived there? Good? Bad? Indifferent? As Yahir travels around Aguablanca and stops to talk to his neighbours, can you guess what path he decided to take?

Innocent on Death Row

Michael Collins & Marty Syjuco

2011

Can there be justice in the Philippine judicial system?

A criminal who didn’t commit a crime. A mystery murder without a body. A look at the corrupt Philippine legal system, like a Kafkaesque story, featuring false witnesses, cover-ups and human rights violations.

Interferenze

Zoe D'Amaro

2007

What impact can a pirate radio have on Italian democracy?

Interfernze explores the intriguing story of what became known as the Telestreet network through the personal experience of the members of Orfeo TV. Operating as a pirate station, the movement aims to give the voiceless the airspace to make themselves heard. The anti-establishment campaign uses civil disobedience as a tool in the quest for democratizing Italy's airwaves.

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2016

Who are the “Iron Ladies” and how have they changed Liberia?

After surviving a 14-year civil war and a government riddled with corruption, Liberia is ready for change. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was inaugurated President – the first freely elected female head of state in Africa. Having won a hotly contested election with the overwhelming support of women across Liberia, Sirleaf faces the daunting task of lifting her country from debt and devastation. She turns to a remarkable team of women, appointing them in positions such as police chief, finance minister, minister of justice, commerce minister and minister of gender. In Iron Ladies, we follow them behind the scenes during their critical first year in office as they tackle indolent bureaucracy, black markets and the omnipresent threat of violent riots.

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2007

Can the first freely elected female head of state in Africa manage to rebuild a country ravaged by war?

With unprecedented access, this intimate documentary goes behind the scenes with Africa's first freely elected female head of state, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, president of Liberia. The film explores the challenges facing the new president and the extraordinary women surrounding her as they develop and implement policy to rebuild their ravaged country and prevent a descent back into civil war.

It Started with a Duck

Sara Koppel

2016

How can ducks help women adapt to climate change?

It Started with a Duck, highlights how something as simple as a duck can advance women’s economic empowerment. Through a seemingly unlikely means, this film unpacks how women are able to play a key role in climate change adaptation and help build resilient communities.

Jailed in America

Roger Ross Williams

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How do prisons make a profit from crime? In the last 30 years, America’s prison population has surged from 330,000 to 2.3 million inmates. In this deeply personal and provocative film, Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams sets out on a mission to investigate the prison system that has helped drive this explosive web of political, social, and economic forces that have consumed so many of Roger’s friends and family.

Japan a Story of Love and Hate

Sean McAllister

2008

What does love look like in Japan after the economic crisis?

When Japan’s economy crashed in the early 1990s Naoki lost everything, ending up divorced and penniless - he was saved from homelessness by his new girlfriend, 29-year-old Yoshie who works at sleazy bar where she is paid to drink and flirt with married men. This films tell the unusual love story of survival in the world’s second richest economy.

Justice for Sale

Femke & Ilse van Velzen

2011

How does foreign aid create a system of justice for sale in Congo?

This film follows Claudine, a young and courageous human rights lawyer, in her struggle against injustice and widespread impunity in Congo. Her investigation into the case of a young soldier convicted of rape, opens her up to a world of widespread corruption seemingly instigated by foreign aid.

Kayak Man

David Michod & Jennifer Peedom

2008

Is an attempt to make history worth your life?

Andrew McAuley sets out to become the first person to kayak from Australia to New Zealand. After a month at sea, his unshakeable need to conquer the unknown, ultimately costs him his life.

Kinshasa 2.0

Teboho Edkins

2007

Can the internet change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world?

Kinshasa 2.0 tells the story of how the arrest of Marie-Thérèse Nlandu, a women from a prominent political family in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was publicised through the Internet and resulted in the filmmaker visting Kingshasa to see how the arrest has affected the family. This film demonstrates how the internet has the potential to change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world.

Land Rush

Hugo Berkley & Osvalde Lewat

2012

Can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off - but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

Last Days of the Arctic

Magnús Viðar Sigurðsson

2011

Can photographer Rax capture the unique lifestyle of his friends in the Arctic before it disappears?

This film follows RAX a world renowed photographer based in Iceland. Rax is on a mission: to document the deteriorating lifestyles of the Northern Hemisphere and bring them to the eyes of the world before it‘s too late.

Looking for the Revolution

Rodrigo Vazquez

2007

Will Bolivian president Evo Morales ever be able to deliver on his promise of a Guevara-style revolution?

Pressed by the masses who gave him a massive mandate, the first indigenous president, ex-coca leaf farmer Evo Morales has nationalised the oil industry and passed laws on agrarian reform. All the election speeches, which resulted in his landslide victory, sounded quite revolutionary, as did the iconography. But a closer look reveals that corruption, nepotism and old-fashioned populism are at the core of this movement. The landowners and the indigenous movement are still wrestling for power and neither has claimed victory yet. Ultimately, the search for the revolution that Che Guevara tried to start in Bolivia is now in Morales’ hands.

Looking for the Revolution

Rodrigo Vazquez Year

2007/2014

Will Bolivian president Evo Morales ever be able to deliver on his promise of a Guevara-style revolution?

Evo Morales, Bolivia’s first indigenous President struggles to empower the poor and end systemic corruption. Comparatively Jiovana Naivis, a corrupt politician witnesses the social change from her prison cell.

Maid in Hell

Søren Klovborg

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can an employment system hide a reality of torture and humiliation? Maid in Hell offers a glimpse into the commonplace reality of harassment, abuse, rape and 18-hour work days which migrant domestic workers across the Middle East face. Trapped by the Kafala system, their passports are confiscated and they are bound to their employer. Unable to flee, they risk harsh punishments or imprisonments if they try. “Maid in Hell” gives unprecedented access to this frightening and brutal form of modern slavery. Following employment agents who vividly describe the trade, as well as maids who struggle to find a way home after harrowing, and sometimes, deadly experiences, we come to understand the grotesque reality faced by thousands of women each day.

Maria and Osmey

Diego Arradondo

2007

What can a children's basketball game teach us about leadership and equality?

This short film tells the story of a group of Cuban children that play a baseball game in their local neighbourhood. Osmey and Maria, together with their friends, make a baseball using a deodorant can and some tape. During their match several situations arise which become conflicts that are resolved in ways only children can manage. A closer inspection of the game reveals the dynamics of participation, leadership and equality. Oblivious to events outside their game, a radio announces changes in Cuba that will one day have dramatic effects on their lives.

Miners Shot Down

Rehad Desai

2014

Can miners on strike in South Africa achieve their aim of better wages?

In August 2012, mineworkers in one of South Africa’s biggest platinum mines began a wildcat strike for better wages. Six days later, the police used live ammunition to brutally suppress the strike, killing 34 and injuring many more. The documentary follows the strike from day one, showing the courageous but isolated fight waged by a group of low paid workers.

Miseducation

Nadine Cloete

2012

What's is like to walk to school in one of the poorest neighbourhood's in South Africa?

What's your walk to school like when, every day, you have to cross one of the poorest parts of South Africa to get to class? Kelina, aged 11, is getting an education in a township in Cape Town, riddled with guns, drugs and violence. How does she see the world on her daily trip to school?

Miss Democracy

Virginia Romero

2007

What can beauty pageants tell us about democracy?

A beauty pageant is held to decide on a Miss Democracy for 2007, and the judges are as eccentric as the contestants. The contestants subtlety reflect their country's political position and answer rounds of questions about their democracies. This humorous representation of international relations highlights the fickle nature of democracy all over the world.

Mumbai Disconnected

Camilla Nielsson & Frederik Jacobi

2009

Can plans to build a new suspension bridge ease Mumbai's llife or death traffic tensions?

In the Indian city of Mumbai, 13 people die on public transportation every day. The solution: a massive suspension bridge to be built off the coast, linking the north of the city to the south.

My Afghanistan

Nagieb Khaja

2012

What can Nagieb learn about his roots on a trip to Afghanistan?

Nagieb Khaja, a young Danish journalist of Afghani origin, travels to Lashkar Gah in Afghanistan. Assisted by 30 locals he captures a rare glimpse of everyday life in a war-torn existence.

My Body My Weapon

Kavita Joshi

2007

Can one women's huger strike restore justice across India?

Irom Sharmila is a young women of Manipur who has been on a hunger strike for nearly 7 years now. She has been demanding that the Indian Regional Government repeal a brutal law. The Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act is one of the drastic measures taken by the Indian Regional Government to assert their control over their territory and suppress any unrest or dissent through military means. Sharmila is willing to stake everything - even her life - to restore justice and dignity for her people.

My Childhood in Hell

Mette Korsgaard

2012

Is it possible to recover from childhood sexual abuse?

Failure, violence and sexual abuse were everyday life in Lisbeth Zornig Andersen’s upbringing. She begins an uncertain journey to uncover how these terrible events could take place.

My Escape

Firas Fayyad & Henrik Grunnet

2016

Will two young Syrian refugees be able to reunite with their families in Europe?

The moving story of two young boys as they attempt to escape the civil war in Syria. The film follows them as they desperately try to become reunited with their families in Europe.

No Burqa's Behind Bars

Nima Sarvestani

2013

How can the human spirit defy the confines of imprisonment?

Thakhar Prison. 40 women. 34 children. Four cells. No burqas… Their stories are deeply compelling and are a testament to the strength and dignity of the human will in the face of obscene conditions.

North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes

Carl Gierstorfer & Sebastian Weis

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How does North Korea sell their own people to fund its dangerous regime? Shrouded in secrecy and notoriously cash-strapped the North Korean regime has resorted to running one of the world’s largest slaving operations - exploiting the profits to fulfill their own agenda. These bonded labourers can be found in Russia, China and dozens of other countries around the world - including EU member states. Featuring undercover footage and powerful testimonials, North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes reveals the scale and brutality of the operation.

Old Peter

Ivan Golovnev

2007

Can indigenous people preserve their culture when forced from their land?

The dialogue between people, nature and gods is based upon a sacred knowledge and mythology. In the modern world only a few cultures based on myth survive. The region of the Khanty people is the basic source of oil recovery in Russia. About 70 percent of all Rassia oil is extracted here. The oil companies actively buy huge territories in the Noth of Siberia. Indigenous people are then forced to leave these places, their own patrimonial territories, and so a modern civilization gradually absorbs an ancient culture.

On the Square

Vanja Juranic

2007

Can commemorating the Yugoslavian war allow wounds to heal?

Croatia is a small country where people like to take big vacations. Post-Yugoslavia, Croatians are dealing with battered history that many are trying to forget. But someone on the town square in Zagreb wants to remind them that wounds take time to heal. Poignantly crafted. On the square is silent reminder of a deafening issue.

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin

Contrabas Video

2016

What is the impact of the early forced marriage of girls?

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin weaves together stories of the forced marriage of young girls from Sudan, Vietnam and Afghanistan. The striking similarity of the girls’ experiences highlight the prevalence of this practice across the world. 

One Extra Year

Gary George Clotario

2016

Why is girls' access to education so important for gender equality?

One Extra Year uncovers the myriad of ways in staying one extra year in school benefits both the girls themselves and the wider society. Acknowledging the numerous barriers which inhibit girls continued learning, this film makes a powerful case for greater investment in girls education.

Park Avenue

Alex Gibney

2012

How much inequality is too much?

The documentary compares the access to opportunities of residents of Park Avenue both on the Upper East Side and in the South Bronx. It draws upon Michael Gross's book "740 Park: The Story of the World’s Richest Apartment Building", which showed that many billionaires live in that building. It goes on to explain that billionaire heir David Koch made significant donations to Paul Ryan in the same way that banker Steven Schwartzman lobbied Charles Schumer—for their own gain. The documentary includes interviews with a doorman at 740 Park Avenue, journalist Jane Mayer, Yale University Professor Jacob Hacker, University of California, Berkeley Professor Paul Piff, and Republican advisor Bruce Bartlett

Playing the Game

Clara Kokseby & Julie Hindkjær

2016

Why is women's political participation and leadership necessary for gender equality?

In the form of an imagined letter to her Father, a woman details how systemic gender inequality excludes women from positions of power. The letter openly asks, how women can become a part of these spaces, calling on the listener to help make this possible.

Please Vote For Me

Weijun Chen

2007

An election to class monitor begs the question; could democracy ever work in China?

Wuhan is a city in central China about the size of London, and it is here that director Weijun Chen has conducted an experiment in democracy. A grade 3 class at Evergreen Primary School has their first encounter with democracy by holding an election to select a Class Monitor. Eight-year-olds compete against each other for the coveted position, abetted and egged on by teachers and doting parents. Elections in China take place only within the Communist Party, but recently millions of Chinese voted in their version of Pop Idol. The purpose of Weijun Chen’s experiment is to determine how, if democracy came to China, it would be received. Is democracy a universal value that fits human nature? Do elections inevitably lead to manipulation? Please Vote for Me is a portrait of a society and a town through a school, its children and its families

Poor Us: An Animated History of Poverty

Ben Lewis

2012

How have attitudes to poverty changed over the ages?

The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age Ben Lewis’ film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality…

Powerless

Deepti Kakkar & Fahad Mustafa

2013

Would you risk your life to flip a switch?

In Kanpur, India, putting oneself in harm’s way to deliver electrical power is all too common. Powerless illuminates the political power struggles taking place across Kapur through the lens of the city's electrical supply.

Putin's Forgotten Children

Hanna Polak

2015

Will 10 year old Yula be able to realize her dream to escape life on the largest garbage dump in Europe?

For 14 years, Oscar-nominated director Hanna Polak follows Yula as she grows up in the forbidden territory of Svalka, the largest garbage dump in Europe and 13 miles from the Kremlin in Putin’s Russia. A dramatic cinema story about coming of age, and maturing to the point of taking destiny into one’s own hands, Putin's Forgotten Children offers a universal message of hope, courage, and life.

Red Chapel

Mads Brügger

2009

Looking for a laugh in North Korea?

Comics Jacob Simon, together with Mads Brügger, who poses as their manager, gets permission to put on a vaudeville act in Pyong Yang, North Korea.

Reluctant Revolutionary

Sean McAllister

2011

What will the Yemen revolution mean for the young men in the country?

As Yemen moves toward an important turning point in the 2011 revolution, documentary filmmaker Sean McAllister follows his guide Kais, a young father who prefers to look on at the tumult from a distance.

Rocking Cambodia: Rise of a Pop Diva

Marc Eberle

2015

Will fame and success will change the life of Cambodia's newest Pop Diva for the better?

When an Australian musician meets a poor Cambodian woman in a Karaoke bar, their tempestuous cross-cultural romance results in the birth of The Cambodian Space Project, a thrilling musical explosion that wows audiences world- wide with sounds from the 1960s and ‘70s golden age of Cambodian rock.

Rough Aunties

Kim Longinotto

2008

How does South Africa treats its most vulnerable people?

Fearless, feisty and resolute, the “Rough Aunties” are a remarkable group of women unwavering in their stand to protect and care for the abused, neglected and forgotten children of Durban, South Africa.

Russia's Toughest Prison

Nick Read & Mark Franchetti

2013

What's life like for inmates in this notorious prison?

Federal Penal Colony No. 56 is situated in central Russia, in a forest larger than Germany and a seven- hour drive from the nearest city. There are 260 prisoners serving out their sentences, all of them for murder.

Samurai and Idiots

Hyoe Yamamoto

2016

Does the collision of cultural values offer fresh insights into the 2011 Olympus Scandal?

This film explores the fallout from the Olympus Corporation scandal in 2011, when the multi-billion dollar Japanese optical company, suddenly dismissed its president and CEO. British-born Michael Woodford was dismissed 6 months into his tenure for blowing the whistle on the 1.7 billion dollar fraud that the company had been keeping secret for more than 20 years.

School Time for Miss Roma

Vesna Cudic

2015

Will young Roma women get the opportunity to pursue their life aspirations?

Every summer, a few brave Roma girls will enter a beauty pageant in the bid to be called Miss Roma. But what if their dream is not a marriage proposal, but to go to high school and get a diploma? With extraordinary access and seldom-seen intimacy, we follow three young women on their journey of high stakes and self-discovery.

Selling Children

Pankaj Johar

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Is poverty raising a generation of children for sale in India? In the world’s largest democracy, India, millions of vulnerable children are bought and sold, given only what they need to survive another day. Throughout Indian society the mechanisms of bonded slave labor are insidious, powerful and nearly impossible to escape for children who have become trapped in a system driven by profits. Indian director, Pankaj Johar, looks behind the overwhelming statistics - revealing how a lack of education and persistent poverty provides a breeding ground for modern slavery.

Sepideh

Berit Madsen

2013

Will a young girl from Iran be able to defy familial and social expectations to become an Astronaut?

This documentary follows Sepideh from her evenings spent explorig the universe, to her teaming up with the world's first female space tourist Anousheh Ansari - all in pursuit of her ambition to become an astronaut.

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2016

How can solar engineering be a route out of poverty for women?

Rafea is the second wife of a Bedouin husband. She is selected to attend the Barefoot College in India that takes uneducated middle-aged women from poor communities and trains them to become solar engineers. The college’s 6-month programme brings together women from all over the world. Learning about electrical components and soldering without being able to read, write or understand English is the easy part. Witness Rafea’s heroic efforts to pull herself and her family out of poverty.

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2012

Will an educaiton in solar engineering prove to be a route out of poverty for women in Jordan?

Rafea is a Bedouin woman who lives with her four daughters in one of Jordan's poorest desert villages on the Iraqi border. She is given a chance to travel to India to attend the Barefoot College, where illiterate grandmothers from around the world are trained in 6 months to be solar engineers. If Rafea succeeds, she will be able to electrify her village, train more engineers, and provide for her daughters. Even when she returns as the first female solar engineer in the country, her real challenge will have just begun. Will she find support for her new venture? Will she be able to inspire the other women in the village to join her and change their lives? And most importantly, will she be able to re-wire the traditional minds of the Bedouin community that stand in her way?

Soldier Woman: To see if I'm smiling

Tamar Yarom

2007

What can we learn about the Israel-Palestinian conflict from the stories of women in the IDF?

A unique look at the tense relationship between Israel and the Palestinian population, through the perspective of women drafted into Israel’s military service.

Soldier's Who Rape

Ilse van Velzen & Femke van Velzen

2009

How is rape used as a weapon of war?

In Democratic Republic of the Congo the mass rape of women by soldiers, is an accepted weapon of war. Here a number of soldiers tell their stories in an effort to acknowledge the atrocities they have committed.

State of Women

Louise Unmack Kjeldsen

2016

What does a day look like for dedicated women’s rights advocates, all over the world?

Every single day 39.000 girls under the age of 18 are sold of to marriage. Every single day at least two women are acid-attacked in India. On the African continent more than three million girls and women are circumcised every year. The statistics are frightening, yet things are moving in the right direction, due to the efforts of many strong advocates around the globe. State of the Women follows inspiring women during one day of their lives, providing the audience with a unique insight to their everyday lives. In the film you will meet the young Afghan rapper Sonita, the Chinese feminist activist Li Ting Ting, CEO of Save the Children; Helle Thorning-Schmidt, and other inspiring and strong women.

Stealing Africa

Christoffer Guldbrandsen

2012

How do multinational companies avoid paying tax in the developing countries where they operate?

Rüschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Steam of Life

Joonas Berghäll

2010

How do saunas encourage men in Finland to reveal their sensitive sides?

Fat men, thin men, old men, men who dress as Santa, vagrants: all of them go to the Finnish sauna. If they don’t have a sauna nearby, they build one. Naked and sweaty, surrounded by steam, the Fins reveal their sensitive sides. In this film, personal, moving stories are interspersed with footage of the beautiful Finnish landscape.

Storm Makers

Guillaume Suon

2014

How does human trafficking tear apart communities in Cambodia?

This film intimately captures the stories of three Cambodians: two human traffickers and a victim. It highlights the consequences of the trafficking business on their individual fates and shows how their humanity ends up trapped by this invisible plague.

Striving for Utopias

Kasper Møller Jensen & Joachim Berg Nielsen

2016

How has women's sexual liberation affected gender equality?

Striving for Utopias explains how over millennia, every society on earth has suppressed women’s sexual rights and bodily freedoms. Laying bare the insidious effects of sexist laws, this film calls for the creation of a Utopia in which women’s sexual liberation is finally realised. 

Taxi to the Dark Side

Alex Gibney

2007

Can terrorism destroy democracy?

This documentary explores the American military's use of torture by focusing on the unsolved murder of an Afghan taxi driver who, in 2002, was taken for questioning at Bagram Force Air Base. Five days later, the man was dead. The medical examiner claimed the driver died from excessive physical abuse. Taking this case as a jumping-off point, the film examines wider claims of torture that occurred at bases like Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay during the Bush administration.

The Benefits of a Toilet

Simon Nørredam

2016

How does access to sanitation affect women and girls around the world?

The Benefits of a Toilet uses clever animation to uncover the various benefits of something the Western World takes for granted; access to a toilet. The stark inequality of access to adequate sanitation is revealed to disproportionately affects girls and women; impeding their learning, ability to work and even their safety.

The Crisis and the Sunglasses

Sean McAllister

2012

Is anyone safe from poverty?

As the European dream fades, the economic crisis brings new poverty to the people of Athens. How will they survive as their society crumbles? A man's life is destroyed by the crisis: "I don't exist anymore" he says. But a small gift makes all the difference to him and his family...

The English Surgeon

Geoffrey Smith

2009

What is it like to try and save a life, and failing?

When British Brain Surgeon Henry Marsh first visited the KGB Hospital in Kiev in the early 1990s, patients were dying from simple brain tumors left untreated. This documentary follows Marsh as he openly confronts the dilemmas of the doctor-patient relationship on his latest mission to the Ukraine.

The Good Son: Sexchange in Israel

Shirly Berkovitz

2013

Will Or be accepted by their community after gender reassignment surgery?

The incredible story of Or, a 22-year-old Israeli person secretly saving up for reassignment surgery in Thailand. A tale about fear, self-doubt, willpower, the importance of family and being able to be who you are.

The Journalist and the Mass Murderer

Rob Lemkin & Thet Sambath

2009

Can Pol Pot's right hand man face up to the reality of the genocidal violence he inflicted?

Over a three-year period Thet Sambath talks with Nuon Chea, Pol Pot’s deputy, about all phases of his political career except the years of the Khmer Rouge regime. Then he makes his first admission.

Advice to Men

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes give advice to men about how they can be allies in the fight for gender equality.

Crown Princess Mary’s Mission

Line Johansen & Helle Slejborg

2016

What can HRH Crown Princess Mary learn from the women she meets in Burkina Faso and Senegal?

In this film we venture with HRH Crown Princess Mary, when she visits the poverty-stricken West-African nation of Burkina Faso. Here, she joins the efforts of local women to gain the right to self-determination over their own bodies. We also revisit HRH’s visit to Senegal last year, where she was involved in the campaign against Female genital mutilation – a painful practice causing harm to millions of women in Africa and some parts of Asia. She reveals the details of her work in the struggle for women’s rights and for empowering disenfranchised women across the globe.

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute

Robin Glass

2016

A film about girls' and women's family planning

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute makes the urgent case for widespread and safe access to contraceptive services. Access to these services is considered vital for reducing ¼ of all maternal deaths and for establishing women’s right to decide how they want to live their lives. 

Facts of Life

Hapetnak Sarkisyan

2016

A film about health services worldwide

Facts of Life uses stark comparison to illustrate health inequality between countries. Highlighting the bleakness of such startling disparity, the narrator compels the audience to be a part of changing these Facts.

Female Rolemodel

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes talk about their female role models. 

If you would give one piece of advice to men - what would it be?

2016

If you were to give one piece of advice to men– what would it be?

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2016

Who are the “Iron Ladies” and how have they changed Liberia?

After surviving a 14-year civil war and a government riddled with corruption, Liberia is ready for change. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was inaugurated President – the first freely elected female head of state in Africa. Having won a hotly contested election with the overwhelming support of women across Liberia, Sirleaf faces the daunting task of lifting her country from debt and devastation. She turns to a remarkable team of women, appointing them in positions such as police chief, finance minister, minister of justice, commerce minister and minister of gender. In Iron Ladies, we follow them behind the scenes during their critical first year in office as they tackle indolent bureaucracy, black markets and the omnipresent threat of violent riots.

It Started with a Duck

Sara Koppel

2016

How can ducks help women adapt to climate change?

It Started with a Duck, highlights how something as simple as a duck can advance women’s economic empowerment. Through a seemingly unlikely means, this film unpacks how women are able to play a key role in climate change adaptation and help build resilient communities.

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin

Contrabas Video

2016

What is the impact of the early forced marriage of girls?

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin weaves together stories of the forced marriage of young girls from Sudan, Vietnam and Afghanistan. The striking similarity of the girls’ experiences highlight the prevalence of this practice across the world. 

One Extra Year

Gary George Clotario

2016

Why is girls' access to education so important for gender equality?

One Extra Year uncovers the myriad of ways in staying one extra year in school benefits both the girls themselves and the wider society. Acknowledging the numerous barriers which inhibit girls continued learning, this film makes a powerful case for greater investment in girls education.

Playing the Game

Clara Kokseby & Julie Hindkjær

2016

Why is women's political participation and leadership necessary for gender equality?

In the form of an imagined letter to her Father, a woman details how systemic gender inequality excludes women from positions of power. The letter openly asks, how women can become a part of these spaces, calling on the listener to help make this possible.

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2016

How can solar engineering be a route out of poverty for women?

Rafea is the second wife of a Bedouin husband. She is selected to attend the Barefoot College in India that takes uneducated middle-aged women from poor communities and trains them to become solar engineers. The college’s 6-month programme brings together women from all over the world. Learning about electrical components and soldering without being able to read, write or understand English is the easy part. Witness Rafea’s heroic efforts to pull herself and her family out of poverty.

State of Women

Louise Unmack Kjeldsen

2016

What does a day look like for dedicated women’s rights advocates, all over the world?

Every single day 39.000 girls under the age of 18 are sold of to marriage. Every single day at least two women are acid-attacked in India. On the African continent more than three million girls and women are circumcised every year. The statistics are frightening, yet things are moving in the right direction, due to the efforts of many strong advocates around the globe. State of the Women follows inspiring women during one day of their lives, providing the audience with a unique insight to their everyday lives. In the film you will meet the young Afghan rapper Sonita, the Chinese feminist activist Li Ting Ting, CEO of Save the Children; Helle Thorning-Schmidt, and other inspiring and strong women.

Striving for Utopias

Kasper Møller Jensen & Joachim Berg Nielsen

2016

How has women's sexual liberation affected gender equality?

Striving for Utopias explains how over millennia, every society on earth has suppressed women’s sexual rights and bodily freedoms. Laying bare the insidious effects of sexist laws, this film calls for the creation of a Utopia in which women’s sexual liberation is finally realised. 

The Benefits of a Toilet

Simon Nørredam

2016

How does access to sanitation affect women and girls around the world?

The Benefits of a Toilet uses clever animation to uncover the various benefits of something the Western World takes for granted; access to a toilet. The stark inequality of access to adequate sanitation is revealed to disproportionately affects girls and women; impeding their learning, ability to work and even their safety.

The Secret Slaves of the Middle-East

Puk Damsgaard & Søren Klovborg

2016

How are unskilled workers being trapped and trafficked in the Middle-East?

Mary Joy Dao-Ay is a Filipino maid who used to be a domestic worker in Lebanon. She left her 3 children in the Philippines, planning to pay for their education by earning a higher salary working in the Middle-East. Instead, she was forced to flee for her own safety, and got stuck in Lebanon seeking refuge at a shelter. The secret slaves of the Middle East is the story of Mary Joys’ desperate struggle for justice, in a country with no labour laws protecting foreign domestic workers, and where the special Arab Kefala-system renders it impossible for an unskilled worker to leave the country or change their employer. It is the story of how poverty leads unprivileged women from developing countries to be deceived and trafficked into slavery.

Welcome to the World

Brian Hill

2016

How does the place you were born affect your future?

130 million babies are born each year, and not one of them decides where they’ll be born or how they’ll live. In Cambodia, you’re likely to be born to a family living on less than $1/day. In Sierra Leone chances of surviving the first year are half those of the worldwide average. In the United States, 1.6 million children are homeless. In Welcome to the World we take a worldwide trip to meet the newest generation, inviting us to reflect on the shocking lottery of childbirth across the globe.

What Ami Did Not Know

Antonio Nardella

2016

An animated film about maternal and newborn health

What Ami Did Not Know is a thought-provoking look at the prevalence of maternal mortality in developing countries. From the perspective of the new-born Ami, the inequality of access to maternal care is laid bare.

What If?

Caroline Sascha Cogez

2016

A film about girls' and women's economic empowerment

What if? poses a series of hypothetical questions, which ask how the world would be different if women were treated equally to men in the world of work. The narrator speculates that closing the gendered gaps in labour participation and wages, would lead to a fairer, wealthier and more equal society.

What challenges are women facing?

2012

Around Copenhagen, Danes reflect on the challenges women face today.

What obstacles do women face today?

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes tell us what obstacles women still face to equal treatment today.

Who is your female role model?

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes tell us who their female role model is and why.

BBC World Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Why does poverty persist in today's world of extreme wealth?

The BBC World Debate is part of a global event hosted by the BBC and 50 other broadcasters around the world. The debate explores the causes of and cures for the enduring problem of severe poverty which still affects many people in the world. The panel is made up of: Tony Blair, former UK Prime Minister; Oby Ezekwesili from the Open Society Foundation in Africa and a former Nigerian government minister; Moeltesi Mbeki, South African author and Chair of SA Institute of International Affairs; and Vandana Shiva, Indian activist, environmentalist and scientist. The debate was chaired by Zeinab Badawi.

Colours in the Dust

Jonathan Stack, Massena "Bougon" Cesar, Huguens Saintil, Jean Peirre Belony & Nicolas Cuellar

2012

Can creativity help Haiti rebuild after the earthquake?

Ten-year-old Jouvens Latour survives Haiti's earthquake, but amidst the suffering, poverty turns into possibility. The young artist believes creativity is the way forward for his country.

DR Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Does foreign aid help or hinder the eradication of poverty?

Education, Education

Weijun Chen

2012

Can a good education provide an escape from poverty?

“In China, the most lucrative Industry is Education.” Wang Zhenxiang, Tutor, Hongbo Education. There is a worldwide economic crisis, but everywhere parents are told that their children may escape the worst if they are educated, and everywhere children are pressured to climb the rungs of the ladder and acquire the totem of middle class life – a university education. But does education secure what it is supposed to? Can a degree really get you out of poverty? Weijun Chen’s film, set in Wuhan in central China, looks at the realities of Chinese education through the lives of Wang Zhenxiang, a tutor at the private Hongbo Education college, Wang Pan, high school graduate and would be student, and Wan Chao, graduate job seeker who goes from one unpromising interview to another.

Finding Josephine

Tomas Sheridan

2012

Who really benefits from charitable donations?

A family has been supporting a child in Uganda via a charity for three years. The father and small daughter travel from UK to Uganda to see if their charity makes any difference: to them or to the child they are supporting.

Give us the Money

Bosse Lindquist

2012

Can glitz and celebrity save the world?

Thirty years ago, rock stars Bob Geldof and Bono set out on a journey to fight poverty in Africa. They tried to convince some of the wiliest and mightiest politicians on earth to change the world. Give us the Money tracks their journey through famines and palaces, and world-wide TV-audiences. But how successful have they really been? Did they manage to make the world a better place? Bosse Lindquist's film tracks the history of this idea. "A band of musicians set out to change the world" he says "and now the time has come to ask: What did they achieve, and is celebrity politics is the right way of combating world poverty?"'

Holiday from Poverty

Jez Lewis

2012

What does it mean to take take a holiday - when you've never had one?

Poor families might not be starving in the UK, but in a culture where most people have more than you, being poor is isolating and shaming, "People look down on you for being poor." This personal film looks at the huge difference just having a holiday can make to a family living in poverty. "They don't want money, they just want their dignity back."

In Your Hands

Lucas Nieto

2012

If you lived in the 11th most violent city in the world, what path would your life take?

Cali in Colombia is the 11th most violent city in the world. Homicide levels are high and more than 40% of the city's murders take place in the district of Aguablanca. In a place where violence is so rife and where gang membership is a way of defending your neighbourhood, what path would you take if you lived there? Good? Bad? Indifferent? As Yahir travels around Aguablanca and stops to talk to his neighbours, can you guess what path he decided to take?

Land Rush

Hugo Berkley & Osvalde Lewat

2012

Can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off - but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

Miseducation

Nadine Cloete

2012

What's is like to walk to school in one of the poorest neighbourhood's in South Africa?

What's your walk to school like when, every day, you have to cross one of the poorest parts of South Africa to get to class? Kelina, aged 11, is getting an education in a township in Cape Town, riddled with guns, drugs and violence. How does she see the world on her daily trip to school?

Park Avenue

Alex Gibney

2012

How much inequality is too much?

The documentary compares the access to opportunities of residents of Park Avenue both on the Upper East Side and in the South Bronx. It draws upon Michael Gross's book "740 Park: The Story of the World’s Richest Apartment Building", which showed that many billionaires live in that building. It goes on to explain that billionaire heir David Koch made significant donations to Paul Ryan in the same way that banker Steven Schwartzman lobbied Charles Schumer—for their own gain. The documentary includes interviews with a doorman at 740 Park Avenue, journalist Jane Mayer, Yale University Professor Jacob Hacker, University of California, Berkeley Professor Paul Piff, and Republican advisor Bruce Bartlett

Poor Us: An Animated History of Poverty

Ben Lewis

2012

How have attitudes to poverty changed over the ages?

The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age Ben Lewis’ film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality…

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2012

Will an educaiton in solar engineering prove to be a route out of poverty for women in Jordan?

Rafea is a Bedouin woman who lives with her four daughters in one of Jordan's poorest desert villages on the Iraqi border. She is given a chance to travel to India to attend the Barefoot College, where illiterate grandmothers from around the world are trained in 6 months to be solar engineers. If Rafea succeeds, she will be able to electrify her village, train more engineers, and provide for her daughters. Even when she returns as the first female solar engineer in the country, her real challenge will have just begun. Will she find support for her new venture? Will she be able to inspire the other women in the village to join her and change their lives? And most importantly, will she be able to re-wire the traditional minds of the Bedouin community that stand in her way?

Stealing Africa

Christoffer Guldbrandsen

2012

How do multinational companies avoid paying tax in the developing countries where they operate?

Rüschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

The Crisis and the Sunglasses

Sean McAllister

2012

Is anyone safe from poverty?

As the European dream fades, the economic crisis brings new poverty to the people of Athens. How will they survive as their society crumbles? A man's life is destroyed by the crisis: "I don't exist anymore" he says. But a small gift makes all the difference to him and his family...

The Thread

Alicia Cano

2012

How can microcredit schemes allow young women their 'coming of age' party they deserve?

Throughout Latin America, a girl's 15th birthday marks her coming of age and is celebrated in style. It's a celebration that many poor rural families can ill-afford - the cost of the girl's dress alone is often prohibitive. Meet Blanca, a seamstress in Uruguay, who took advantage of a micro-credit scheme to invest in a sewing machine. Today she runs a business that makes and rents out affordable dresses. Now all the girls in her village can enjoy their coming of age.

WHY POVERTY? Series Trailer

2012

Why Poverty? is a ground breaking, global media event, online and on TV, using films to get people talking about poverty, wealth and inequality. Together with 70 broadcasaters this campaign created the first ever global dialogue on poverty.

Waste

Valentin Thurn

2012

Why does the West waste so much food?

1/3 of food heads for the trash. The food thrown away in Europe and North America would be enough to feed all the hungry people in the world three times over. 3 million tones of bread are thrown away in the European Union each year.

Welcome to the World

Brian Hill

2012

Is it worse to be born poor than to die poor?

130 million babies are born each year, and not one of them decides where they’ll be born or how they’ll live. In Cambodia, you’re likely to be born to a family living on less than $1/day. In Sierra Leone chances of surviving the first year are half those of the worldwide average. We go around the world to meet the newest generation.

Wilbur Goes Poor

Adrien Roche

2012

What does poverty look like to you?

Wilbur Sargunaraj, India's first YouTube star is famous for his video showing westerners how to use an eastern toilet. In his irreverent comical style, he gives a guide within a music video for a western audience how to deal with poor people from the slums. Wilbur looks at poverty and inequality in India.

Bloody Cartoons

Karsten Kjaer

2007

What do Danish cartoons tell us about contemporary democracy?

Bloody Cartoons is a documentary about how and why drawings in a Danish provincial paper could whirl a small country into a confrontation with Muslims all over the world. He asks whether respect for Islam combined with the heated response to the cartoons is now leading us towards self-censorship. How tolerant should we be of the intolerant? And what limits should there be, if any, to freedom of speech in a democracy?

Campaign! The Kawasaki Candidate

Kazuhiro Soda

2007

Can a candidate with no political experience and no charisma win an election with the backing of influential people?

In the fall of 2005, 40-year-old, self-employed Kazuhiko "Yama-san" Yamauchi's peaceful, humdrum life was turned upside-down. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) had suddenly chosen him as its official candidate to run for a vacant seat on the Kawasaki city council. Yama-san had zero experience in politics, no charisma, no supporters, no constituency, and no time to prepare for the impending election. The election was critical for the LDP. Adhering to the campaign tactic of "bowing to everybody, even to telephone poles," Yama-san visits local festivals, kindergarten sports events, senior gatherings, commuter train stations, and even bus stops to offer his hand to every one he sees. Can Yama-san win this heated race? Through its candid, cinema-verite style camerawork, this rare, detailed documentary of a Japanese election reveals the true nature of "democracy."

Coming of Age

Judy Kibinge

2007

What does democracy look like through a child's eyes?

The film depicts the three stages of democracy as seen through the eyes of a girl growing up in Kenya. The Kenyatta Era was a time of great optimism and post-independence euphoria. It was followed by the era of dictatorship under Daniel arap Moi, and finally the ushering in of a third president, Mwai Kibaki. But after the disputed election results in December 2007 and the resultant violent civil strife and the death of hundreds, we are left wondering if democracy can ever truly come of age.

Don't Shoot

Lucilla Blankenberg

2007

What are the secret to success of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader?

Riaan Cruywagen has been reading the news on television since it arrived in South Africa in 1976. He prides himself in the nickname, "The face of news in South Africa" and his record of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader in the world. In the context of South Africa's spectacular transformation to democracy, Riaan explains how his professional ethics have kept him in the news readers seat.

Egypt: We are watching you

Leila Menjou & Sherief Fahmy

2007

What role can ordinary citizens play in shaping democracy in Egypt?

In his 2005 State of the Union address President George W. Bush cites Egypt as the country that will pave the way for democracy in the Middle East. Three women, unable to sit by while their country is on the brink of drastic change, start a grassroots movement to educate and empower the public by raising awareness about the meaning of democracy. They name their campaign Shayfeen.com, which means to “we are watching you.” This film follows the highs and lows of the first year of the movement in Egypt. Insisting that only the people can make change happen, their goal is to educate the Egyptian public on what it takes to build the most basic pillars of democracy: demanding basic human rights, freedom of speech and the establishment of an independent judiciary. Egypt: We are Watching You shows the role ordinary citizens can play in shaping and securing their democracy.

Famous Last Words

Avril Evans

2007

What effect did the 7/7 London Bombings have on local's attitude to foreign integration?

In an environment of imminent terrorist threat, this film unravels the complex attitudes people have towards ethnic minorities and the anxieties both parties have suffered since the London bombings of 7/7/05. Misconceptions and stereotypes persist as we follow one woman on her route to a job interview and the silent hostilities ash encounters as a Muslim.

Feminine, Masculine

Sadaf Foroughi

2007

Can changing Tehran's sexist segregation on buses have a wider impact on gender equality across Iran?

In the male dominated society of Iran, Farahnaz Shiri, the first female bus driver in Tehran, has made her own little society in her bus. In Iran there are different sections for men and women on public buses. But in Mrs. On Shiri's bus, everything is vice versa. In her bus, women are made to feel empowered and enjoy the privilege of freely debating their position in Iranian society. Mrs. Shiri's struggle to prove herself in this society provides a fascinating insight into gender and power in the close space of a public bus.

For God, the Tsar and the Fatherland

Nino Kirtadze

2007

Can life in Russia's 'village of fools' make you more patriotic?

Mikhail Morozov is a Russian patriot, good Christian and successful businessman. He owns Durakovo – the “Village of Fools” – 100 km southwest of Moscow. People come here from all over Russia to learn how to live and become true Russians. When they join the Village of Fools, the new residents abandon all their former rights and agree to obey Mikhail Morozov’s strict rules. he whole spectrum of state power – political, spiritual and administrative – gather in the village for semi-private meetings with Morozov. They discuss the future of Russia, their ambitions and their goals. For God, Tsar and Fatherland shows what drives Russian patriotism today and why they are against democracy.

In Search of Ghandi

Lalit Vachani

2007

Can Ghandi's influence still be found in the modern India: the world's largest democracy?

In the early decades of the twentieth century Mahatma Gandhi’s legacy of non-violent revolution or Satyagraha inspired a mass movement of millions of Indians to rise up against the British colonial state and successfully agitate for the establishment of a democratic and free India. In 007, the country is preparing to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of its existence as an independent nation. But what kind of a democracy does India have today? What does it actually mean to live in the world’s largest democracy? In road-movie style the film crew travels down the famous trail of Gandhi’s salt march, the remarkable mass campaign that galvanized ordinary Indians to join the non-violent struggle for democracy and freedom almost a century ago. Stopping at the same villages and cities, where Gandhi and his followers had raised their call for independence, the film documents the stories of ordinary citizens in India today. Although inspired by a historical event In Search of Gandhi is not a journey back in time. Instead, it is a search for the present and future of democracy in India.

Interferenze

Zoe D'Amaro

2007

What impact can a pirate radio have on Italian democracy?

Interfernze explores the intriguing story of what became known as the Telestreet network through the personal experience of the members of Orfeo TV. Operating as a pirate station, the movement aims to give the voiceless the airspace to make themselves heard. The anti-establishment campaign uses civil disobedience as a tool in the quest for democratizing Italy's airwaves.

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2007

Can the first freely elected female head of state in Africa manage to rebuild a country ravaged by war?

With unprecedented access, this intimate documentary goes behind the scenes with Africa's first freely elected female head of state, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, president of Liberia. The film explores the challenges facing the new president and the extraordinary women surrounding her as they develop and implement policy to rebuild their ravaged country and prevent a descent back into civil war.

Kinshasa 2.0

Teboho Edkins

2007

Can the internet change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world?

Kinshasa 2.0 tells the story of how the arrest of Marie-Thérèse Nlandu, a women from a prominent political family in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was publicised through the Internet and resulted in the filmmaker visting Kingshasa to see how the arrest has affected the family. This film demonstrates how the internet has the potential to change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world.

Looking for the Revolution

Rodrigo Vazquez

2007

Will Bolivian president Evo Morales ever be able to deliver on his promise of a Guevara-style revolution?

Pressed by the masses who gave him a massive mandate, the first indigenous president, ex-coca leaf farmer Evo Morales has nationalised the oil industry and passed laws on agrarian reform. All the election speeches, which resulted in his landslide victory, sounded quite revolutionary, as did the iconography. But a closer look reveals that corruption, nepotism and old-fashioned populism are at the core of this movement. The landowners and the indigenous movement are still wrestling for power and neither has claimed victory yet. Ultimately, the search for the revolution that Che Guevara tried to start in Bolivia is now in Morales’ hands.

Maria and Osmey

Diego Arradondo

2007

What can a children's basketball game teach us about leadership and equality?

This short film tells the story of a group of Cuban children that play a baseball game in their local neighbourhood. Osmey and Maria, together with their friends, make a baseball using a deodorant can and some tape. During their match several situations arise which become conflicts that are resolved in ways only children can manage. A closer inspection of the game reveals the dynamics of participation, leadership and equality. Oblivious to events outside their game, a radio announces changes in Cuba that will one day have dramatic effects on their lives.

Miss Democracy

Virginia Romero

2007

What can beauty pageants tell us about democracy?

A beauty pageant is held to decide on a Miss Democracy for 2007, and the judges are as eccentric as the contestants. The contestants subtlety reflect their country's political position and answer rounds of questions about their democracies. This humorous representation of international relations highlights the fickle nature of democracy all over the world.

My Body My Weapon

Kavita Joshi

2007

Can one women's huger strike restore justice across India?

Irom Sharmila is a young women of Manipur who has been on a hunger strike for nearly 7 years now. She has been demanding that the Indian Regional Government repeal a brutal law. The Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act is one of the drastic measures taken by the Indian Regional Government to assert their control over their territory and suppress any unrest or dissent through military means. Sharmila is willing to stake everything - even her life - to restore justice and dignity for her people.

Old Peter

Ivan Golovnev

2007

Can indigenous people preserve their culture when forced from their land?

The dialogue between people, nature and gods is based upon a sacred knowledge and mythology. In the modern world only a few cultures based on myth survive. The region of the Khanty people is the basic source of oil recovery in Russia. About 70 percent of all Rassia oil is extracted here. The oil companies actively buy huge territories in the Noth of Siberia. Indigenous people are then forced to leave these places, their own patrimonial territories, and so a modern civilization gradually absorbs an ancient culture.

On the Square

Vanja Juranic

2007

Can commemorating the Yugoslavian war allow wounds to heal?

Croatia is a small country where people like to take big vacations. Post-Yugoslavia, Croatians are dealing with battered history that many are trying to forget. But someone on the town square in Zagreb wants to remind them that wounds take time to heal. Poignantly crafted. On the square is silent reminder of a deafening issue.

Please Vote For Me

Weijun Chen

2007

An election to class monitor begs the question; could democracy ever work in China?

Wuhan is a city in central China about the size of London, and it is here that director Weijun Chen has conducted an experiment in democracy. A grade 3 class at Evergreen Primary School has their first encounter with democracy by holding an election to select a Class Monitor. Eight-year-olds compete against each other for the coveted position, abetted and egged on by teachers and doting parents. Elections in China take place only within the Communist Party, but recently millions of Chinese voted in their version of Pop Idol. The purpose of Weijun Chen’s experiment is to determine how, if democracy came to China, it would be received. Is democracy a universal value that fits human nature? Do elections inevitably lead to manipulation? Please Vote for Me is a portrait of a society and a town through a school, its children and its families

Taxi to the Dark Side

Alex Gibney

2007

Can terrorism destroy democracy?

This documentary explores the American military's use of torture by focusing on the unsolved murder of an Afghan taxi driver who, in 2002, was taken for questioning at Bagram Force Air Base. Five days later, the man was dead. The medical examiner claimed the driver died from excessive physical abuse. Taking this case as a jumping-off point, the film examines wider claims of torture that occurred at bases like Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay during the Bush administration.

Three Blind Men

Kanu Behl

2007

What lessons of resistance can be learned from India's biggest democracy?

India is the largest democracy in the world and in Delhi the capital there is a street set aside for permanent protests, Parliament Street. People converge daily to make all sorts of grand demands. Amongst the crowds, on this day, three blind men come across an elephant and while the crowds surge and shout their demands the men try to decide what the elephant is. They each experience something different – one thinks it’s a buffalo, another a wall, or is it a camel? The mahout has another point of view.

A Woman Captured

Bernadett Tuza-Ritter

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can Freedom ever be more frightening than enslavement? A Woman Captured is a raw and intimate portrayal of the psychology behind enslavement. Award-winning Director Bernadett Tuza-Ritter offers an evocative study of a woman so debased and disregarded that even she has lost sight of her own life. As a close friendship develops between the captured woman (Marish) and the filmmaker, Marish’s confidence is slowly restored as she begins to imagine a different life for herself. With this new found sense of confidence, will A Woman Captured ever be able to escape the unbearable oppression to become a free woman?

I was a Yazidi slave

David Evans

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can there be justice after genocide, sexual violence and slavery? In August 2014, an Islamic State massacre of unimaginable proportions took place during the rapid invasion of the Yazidi people in Sinjar, northern Iraq. Young Yazidi women were separated from the old and taken to the Galaxy Cinema in Mosul. There they were paraded, selected, enslaved, tortured and systematically raped. Some were only 11 years old. I was a Yazidi slave follows the Yazidi women’s journey to recovery and ask how a survivor of unthinkable sexual violence can find justice and a path to rehabilitation.

Jailed in America

Roger Ross Williams

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How do prisons make a profit from crime? In the last 30 years, America’s prison population has surged from 330,000 to 2.3 million inmates. In this deeply personal and provocative film, Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams sets out on a mission to investigate the prison system that has helped drive this explosive web of political, social, and economic forces that have consumed so many of Roger’s friends and family.

Maid in Hell

Søren Klovborg

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can an employment system hide a reality of torture and humiliation? Maid in Hell offers a glimpse into the commonplace reality of harassment, abuse, rape and 18-hour work days which migrant domestic workers across the Middle East face. Trapped by the Kafala system, their passports are confiscated and they are bound to their employer. Unable to flee, they risk harsh punishments or imprisonments if they try. “Maid in Hell” gives unprecedented access to this frightening and brutal form of modern slavery. Following employment agents who vividly describe the trade, as well as maids who struggle to find a way home after harrowing, and sometimes, deadly experiences, we come to understand the grotesque reality faced by thousands of women each day.

North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes

Carl Gierstorfer & Sebastian Weis

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How does North Korea sell their own people to fund its dangerous regime? Shrouded in secrecy and notoriously cash-strapped the North Korean regime has resorted to running one of the world’s largest slaving operations - exploiting the profits to fulfill their own agenda. These bonded labourers can be found in Russia, China and dozens of other countries around the world - including EU member states. Featuring undercover footage and powerful testimonials, North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes reveals the scale and brutality of the operation.

Selling Children

Pankaj Johar

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Is poverty raising a generation of children for sale in India? In the world’s largest democracy, India, millions of vulnerable children are bought and sold, given only what they need to survive another day. Throughout Indian society the mechanisms of bonded slave labor are insidious, powerful and nearly impossible to escape for children who have become trapped in a system driven by profits. Indian director, Pankaj Johar, looks behind the overwhelming statistics - revealing how a lack of education and persistent poverty provides a breeding ground for modern slavery.

WHY PLASTIC? Trailer 2018

China 

2018

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A Woman Captured

Bernadett Tuza-Ritter

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can Freedom ever be more frightening than enslavement? A Woman Captured is a raw and intimate portrayal of the psychology behind enslavement. Award-winning Director Bernadett Tuza-Ritter offers an evocative study of a woman so debased and disregarded that even she has lost sight of her own life. As a close friendship develops between the captured woman (Marish) and the filmmaker, Marish’s confidence is slowly restored as she begins to imagine a different life for herself. With this new found sense of confidence, will A Woman Captured ever be able to escape the unbearable oppression to become a free woman?

Bloody Cartoons

Karsten Kjaer

2007

What do Danish cartoons tell us about contemporary democracy?

Bloody Cartoons is a documentary about how and why drawings in a Danish provincial paper could whirl a small country into a confrontation with Muslims all over the world. He asks whether respect for Islam combined with the heated response to the cartoons is now leading us towards self-censorship. How tolerant should we be of the intolerant? And what limits should there be, if any, to freedom of speech in a democracy?

Campaign! The Kawasaki Candidate

Kazuhiro Soda

2007

Can a candidate with no political experience and no charisma win an election with the backing of influential people?

In the fall of 2005, 40-year-old, self-employed Kazuhiko "Yama-san" Yamauchi's peaceful, humdrum life was turned upside-down. Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) had suddenly chosen him as its official candidate to run for a vacant seat on the Kawasaki city council. Yama-san had zero experience in politics, no charisma, no supporters, no constituency, and no time to prepare for the impending election. The election was critical for the LDP. Adhering to the campaign tactic of "bowing to everybody, even to telephone poles," Yama-san visits local festivals, kindergarten sports events, senior gatherings, commuter train stations, and even bus stops to offer his hand to every one he sees. Can Yama-san win this heated race? Through its candid, cinema-verite style camerawork, this rare, detailed documentary of a Japanese election reveals the true nature of "democracy."

Crown Princess Mary’s Mission

Line Johansen & Helle Slejborg

2016

What can HRH Crown Princess Mary learn from the women she meets in Burkina Faso and Senegal?

In this film we venture with HRH Crown Princess Mary, when she visits the poverty-stricken West-African nation of Burkina Faso. Here, she joins the efforts of local women to gain the right to self-determination over their own bodies. We also revisit HRH’s visit to Senegal last year, where she was involved in the campaign against Female genital mutilation – a painful practice causing harm to millions of women in Africa and some parts of Asia. She reveals the details of her work in the struggle for women’s rights and for empowering disenfranchised women across the globe.

Education, Education

Weijun Chen

2012

Can a good education provide an escape from poverty?

“In China, the most lucrative Industry is Education.” Wang Zhenxiang, Tutor, Hongbo Education. There is a worldwide economic crisis, but everywhere parents are told that their children may escape the worst if they are educated, and everywhere children are pressured to climb the rungs of the ladder and acquire the totem of middle class life – a university education. But does education secure what it is supposed to? Can a degree really get you out of poverty? Weijun Chen’s film, set in Wuhan in central China, looks at the realities of Chinese education through the lives of Wang Zhenxiang, a tutor at the private Hongbo Education college, Wang Pan, high school graduate and would be student, and Wan Chao, graduate job seeker who goes from one unpromising interview to another.

Egypt: We are watching you

Leila Menjou & Sherief Fahmy

2007

What role can ordinary citizens play in shaping democracy in Egypt?

In his 2005 State of the Union address President George W. Bush cites Egypt as the country that will pave the way for democracy in the Middle East. Three women, unable to sit by while their country is on the brink of drastic change, start a grassroots movement to educate and empower the public by raising awareness about the meaning of democracy. They name their campaign Shayfeen.com, which means to “we are watching you.” This film follows the highs and lows of the first year of the movement in Egypt. Insisting that only the people can make change happen, their goal is to educate the Egyptian public on what it takes to build the most basic pillars of democracy: demanding basic human rights, freedom of speech and the establishment of an independent judiciary. Egypt: We are Watching You shows the role ordinary citizens can play in shaping and securing their democracy.

For God, the Tsar and the Fatherland

Nino Kirtadze

2007

Can life in Russia's 'village of fools' make you more patriotic?

Mikhail Morozov is a Russian patriot, good Christian and successful businessman. He owns Durakovo – the “Village of Fools” – 100 km southwest of Moscow. People come here from all over Russia to learn how to live and become true Russians. When they join the Village of Fools, the new residents abandon all their former rights and agree to obey Mikhail Morozov’s strict rules. he whole spectrum of state power – political, spiritual and administrative – gather in the village for semi-private meetings with Morozov. They discuss the future of Russia, their ambitions and their goals. For God, Tsar and Fatherland shows what drives Russian patriotism today and why they are against democracy.

Give us the Money

Bosse Lindquist

2012

Can glitz and celebrity save the world?

Thirty years ago, rock stars Bob Geldof and Bono set out on a journey to fight poverty in Africa. They tried to convince some of the wiliest and mightiest politicians on earth to change the world. Give us the Money tracks their journey through famines and palaces, and world-wide TV-audiences. But how successful have they really been? Did they manage to make the world a better place? Bosse Lindquist's film tracks the history of this idea. "A band of musicians set out to change the world" he says "and now the time has come to ask: What did they achieve, and is celebrity politics is the right way of combating world poverty?"'

I was a Yazidi slave

David Evans

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can there be justice after genocide, sexual violence and slavery? In August 2014, an Islamic State massacre of unimaginable proportions took place during the rapid invasion of the Yazidi people in Sinjar, northern Iraq. Young Yazidi women were separated from the old and taken to the Galaxy Cinema in Mosul. There they were paraded, selected, enslaved, tortured and systematically raped. Some were only 11 years old. I was a Yazidi slave follows the Yazidi women’s journey to recovery and ask how a survivor of unthinkable sexual violence can find justice and a path to rehabilitation.

In Search of Ghandi

Lalit Vachani

2007

Can Ghandi's influence still be found in the modern India: the world's largest democracy?

In the early decades of the twentieth century Mahatma Gandhi’s legacy of non-violent revolution or Satyagraha inspired a mass movement of millions of Indians to rise up against the British colonial state and successfully agitate for the establishment of a democratic and free India. In 007, the country is preparing to celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of its existence as an independent nation. But what kind of a democracy does India have today? What does it actually mean to live in the world’s largest democracy? In road-movie style the film crew travels down the famous trail of Gandhi’s salt march, the remarkable mass campaign that galvanized ordinary Indians to join the non-violent struggle for democracy and freedom almost a century ago. Stopping at the same villages and cities, where Gandhi and his followers had raised their call for independence, the film documents the stories of ordinary citizens in India today. Although inspired by a historical event In Search of Gandhi is not a journey back in time. Instead, it is a search for the present and future of democracy in India.

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2016

Who are the “Iron Ladies” and how have they changed Liberia?

After surviving a 14-year civil war and a government riddled with corruption, Liberia is ready for change. On January 16, 2006, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf was inaugurated President – the first freely elected female head of state in Africa. Having won a hotly contested election with the overwhelming support of women across Liberia, Sirleaf faces the daunting task of lifting her country from debt and devastation. She turns to a remarkable team of women, appointing them in positions such as police chief, finance minister, minister of justice, commerce minister and minister of gender. In Iron Ladies, we follow them behind the scenes during their critical first year in office as they tackle indolent bureaucracy, black markets and the omnipresent threat of violent riots.

Iron Ladies of Liberia

Daniel Junge & Siatta Scott Johnson

2007

Can the first freely elected female head of state in Africa manage to rebuild a country ravaged by war?

With unprecedented access, this intimate documentary goes behind the scenes with Africa's first freely elected female head of state, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, president of Liberia. The film explores the challenges facing the new president and the extraordinary women surrounding her as they develop and implement policy to rebuild their ravaged country and prevent a descent back into civil war.

Jailed in America

Roger Ross Williams

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How do prisons make a profit from crime? In the last 30 years, America’s prison population has surged from 330,000 to 2.3 million inmates. In this deeply personal and provocative film, Academy Award-winning director Roger Ross Williams sets out on a mission to investigate the prison system that has helped drive this explosive web of political, social, and economic forces that have consumed so many of Roger’s friends and family.

Land Rush

Hugo Berkley & Osvalde Lewat

2012

Can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

75% of Mali's population are farmers, but rich, land-hungry nations like China and Saudi Arabia are leasing Mali's land in order to turn large areas into agribusiness farms. Many Malian peasants do not welcome these efforts, seeing them as yet another manifestation of imperialism. As Mali experiences a military coup, the developers are scared off - but can Mali's farmers combat food shortages and escape poverty on their own terms?

Looking for the Revolution

Rodrigo Vazquez

2007

Will Bolivian president Evo Morales ever be able to deliver on his promise of a Guevara-style revolution?

Pressed by the masses who gave him a massive mandate, the first indigenous president, ex-coca leaf farmer Evo Morales has nationalised the oil industry and passed laws on agrarian reform. All the election speeches, which resulted in his landslide victory, sounded quite revolutionary, as did the iconography. But a closer look reveals that corruption, nepotism and old-fashioned populism are at the core of this movement. The landowners and the indigenous movement are still wrestling for power and neither has claimed victory yet. Ultimately, the search for the revolution that Che Guevara tried to start in Bolivia is now in Morales’ hands.

Maid in Hell

Søren Klovborg

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Can an employment system hide a reality of torture and humiliation? Maid in Hell offers a glimpse into the commonplace reality of harassment, abuse, rape and 18-hour work days which migrant domestic workers across the Middle East face. Trapped by the Kafala system, their passports are confiscated and they are bound to their employer. Unable to flee, they risk harsh punishments or imprisonments if they try. “Maid in Hell” gives unprecedented access to this frightening and brutal form of modern slavery. Following employment agents who vividly describe the trade, as well as maids who struggle to find a way home after harrowing, and sometimes, deadly experiences, we come to understand the grotesque reality faced by thousands of women each day.

North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes

Carl Gierstorfer & Sebastian Weis

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

How does North Korea sell their own people to fund its dangerous regime? Shrouded in secrecy and notoriously cash-strapped the North Korean regime has resorted to running one of the world’s largest slaving operations - exploiting the profits to fulfill their own agenda. These bonded labourers can be found in Russia, China and dozens of other countries around the world - including EU member states. Featuring undercover footage and powerful testimonials, North Korea’s Secret Slaves: Dollar Heroes reveals the scale and brutality of the operation.

Park Avenue

Alex Gibney

2012

How much inequality is too much?

The documentary compares the access to opportunities of residents of Park Avenue both on the Upper East Side and in the South Bronx. It draws upon Michael Gross's book "740 Park: The Story of the World’s Richest Apartment Building", which showed that many billionaires live in that building. It goes on to explain that billionaire heir David Koch made significant donations to Paul Ryan in the same way that banker Steven Schwartzman lobbied Charles Schumer—for their own gain. The documentary includes interviews with a doorman at 740 Park Avenue, journalist Jane Mayer, Yale University Professor Jacob Hacker, University of California, Berkeley Professor Paul Piff, and Republican advisor Bruce Bartlett

Please Vote For Me

Weijun Chen

2007

An election to class monitor begs the question; could democracy ever work in China?

Wuhan is a city in central China about the size of London, and it is here that director Weijun Chen has conducted an experiment in democracy. A grade 3 class at Evergreen Primary School has their first encounter with democracy by holding an election to select a Class Monitor. Eight-year-olds compete against each other for the coveted position, abetted and egged on by teachers and doting parents. Elections in China take place only within the Communist Party, but recently millions of Chinese voted in their version of Pop Idol. The purpose of Weijun Chen’s experiment is to determine how, if democracy came to China, it would be received. Is democracy a universal value that fits human nature? Do elections inevitably lead to manipulation? Please Vote for Me is a portrait of a society and a town through a school, its children and its families

Poor Us: An Animated History of Poverty

Ben Lewis

2012

How have attitudes to poverty changed over the ages?

The poor may always have been with us, but attitudes towards them have changed. Beginning in the Neolithic Age Ben Lewis’ film takes us through the changing world of poverty. You go to sleep, you dream, you become poor through the ages. And when you awake, what can you say about poverty now? There are still very poor people, to be sure, but the new poverty has more to do with inequality…

Selling Children

Pankaj Johar

2018

*FILM COMING DECEMBER 2ND*

Is poverty raising a generation of children for sale in India? In the world’s largest democracy, India, millions of vulnerable children are bought and sold, given only what they need to survive another day. Throughout Indian society the mechanisms of bonded slave labor are insidious, powerful and nearly impossible to escape for children who have become trapped in a system driven by profits. Indian director, Pankaj Johar, looks behind the overwhelming statistics - revealing how a lack of education and persistent poverty provides a breeding ground for modern slavery.

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2016

How can solar engineering be a route out of poverty for women?

Rafea is the second wife of a Bedouin husband. She is selected to attend the Barefoot College in India that takes uneducated middle-aged women from poor communities and trains them to become solar engineers. The college’s 6-month programme brings together women from all over the world. Learning about electrical components and soldering without being able to read, write or understand English is the easy part. Witness Rafea’s heroic efforts to pull herself and her family out of poverty.

Solar Mamas

Mona Eldaief & Jehane Noujaim

2012

Will an educaiton in solar engineering prove to be a route out of poverty for women in Jordan?

Rafea is a Bedouin woman who lives with her four daughters in one of Jordan's poorest desert villages on the Iraqi border. She is given a chance to travel to India to attend the Barefoot College, where illiterate grandmothers from around the world are trained in 6 months to be solar engineers. If Rafea succeeds, she will be able to electrify her village, train more engineers, and provide for her daughters. Even when she returns as the first female solar engineer in the country, her real challenge will have just begun. Will she find support for her new venture? Will she be able to inspire the other women in the village to join her and change their lives? And most importantly, will she be able to re-wire the traditional minds of the Bedouin community that stand in her way?

State of Women

Louise Unmack Kjeldsen

2016

What does a day look like for dedicated women’s rights advocates, all over the world?

Every single day 39.000 girls under the age of 18 are sold of to marriage. Every single day at least two women are acid-attacked in India. On the African continent more than three million girls and women are circumcised every year. The statistics are frightening, yet things are moving in the right direction, due to the efforts of many strong advocates around the globe. State of the Women follows inspiring women during one day of their lives, providing the audience with a unique insight to their everyday lives. In the film you will meet the young Afghan rapper Sonita, the Chinese feminist activist Li Ting Ting, CEO of Save the Children; Helle Thorning-Schmidt, and other inspiring and strong women.

Stealing Africa

Christoffer Guldbrandsen

2012

How do multinational companies avoid paying tax in the developing countries where they operate?

Rüschlikon is a village in Switzerland with a very low tax rate and very wealthy residents. But it receives more tax revenue than it can use. This is largely thanks to one resident - Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore, whose copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty tax revenue for the Zambians. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but 60% of the population live on less than $1 a day and 80% are unemployed. Based on original research into public documents, the film describes the tax system employed by multinational companies in Africa.

Taxi to the Dark Side

Alex Gibney

2007

Can terrorism destroy democracy?

This documentary explores the American military's use of torture by focusing on the unsolved murder of an Afghan taxi driver who, in 2002, was taken for questioning at Bagram Force Air Base. Five days later, the man was dead. The medical examiner claimed the driver died from excessive physical abuse. Taking this case as a jumping-off point, the film examines wider claims of torture that occurred at bases like Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay during the Bush administration.

The Secret Slaves of the Middle-East

Puk Damsgaard & Søren Klovborg

2016

How are unskilled workers being trapped and trafficked in the Middle-East?

Mary Joy Dao-Ay is a Filipino maid who used to be a domestic worker in Lebanon. She left her 3 children in the Philippines, planning to pay for their education by earning a higher salary working in the Middle-East. Instead, she was forced to flee for her own safety, and got stuck in Lebanon seeking refuge at a shelter. The secret slaves of the Middle East is the story of Mary Joys’ desperate struggle for justice, in a country with no labour laws protecting foreign domestic workers, and where the special Arab Kefala-system renders it impossible for an unskilled worker to leave the country or change their employer. It is the story of how poverty leads unprivileged women from developing countries to be deceived and trafficked into slavery.

Welcome to the World

Brian Hill

2016

How does the place you were born affect your future?

130 million babies are born each year, and not one of them decides where they’ll be born or how they’ll live. In Cambodia, you’re likely to be born to a family living on less than $1/day. In Sierra Leone chances of surviving the first year are half those of the worldwide average. In the United States, 1.6 million children are homeless. In Welcome to the World we take a worldwide trip to meet the newest generation, inviting us to reflect on the shocking lottery of childbirth across the globe.

Welcome to the World

Brian Hill

2012

Is it worse to be born poor than to die poor?

130 million babies are born each year, and not one of them decides where they’ll be born or how they’ll live. In Cambodia, you’re likely to be born to a family living on less than $1/day. In Sierra Leone chances of surviving the first year are half those of the worldwide average. We go around the world to meet the newest generation.

Colours in the Dust

Jonathan Stack, Massena "Bougon" Cesar, Huguens Saintil, Jean Peirre Belony & Nicolas Cuellar

2012

Can creativity help Haiti rebuild after the earthquake?

Ten-year-old Jouvens Latour survives Haiti's earthquake, but amidst the suffering, poverty turns into possibility. The young artist believes creativity is the way forward for his country.

Coming of Age

Judy Kibinge

2007

What does democracy look like through a child's eyes?

The film depicts the three stages of democracy as seen through the eyes of a girl growing up in Kenya. The Kenyatta Era was a time of great optimism and post-independence euphoria. It was followed by the era of dictatorship under Daniel arap Moi, and finally the ushering in of a third president, Mwai Kibaki. But after the disputed election results in December 2007 and the resultant violent civil strife and the death of hundreds, we are left wondering if democracy can ever truly come of age.

Don't Shoot

Lucilla Blankenberg

2007

What are the secret to success of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader?

Riaan Cruywagen has been reading the news on television since it arrived in South Africa in 1976. He prides himself in the nickname, "The face of news in South Africa" and his record of the longest serving Afrikaan news reader in the world. In the context of South Africa's spectacular transformation to democracy, Riaan explains how his professional ethics have kept him in the news readers seat.

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute

Robin Glass

2016

A film about girls' and women's family planning

Every Year, Every Hour, Every Minute makes the urgent case for widespread and safe access to contraceptive services. Access to these services is considered vital for reducing ¼ of all maternal deaths and for establishing women’s right to decide how they want to live their lives. 

Facts of Life

Hapetnak Sarkisyan

2016

A film about health services worldwide

Facts of Life uses stark comparison to illustrate health inequality between countries. Highlighting the bleakness of such startling disparity, the narrator compels the audience to be a part of changing these Facts.

Famous Last Words

Avril Evans

2007

What effect did the 7/7 London Bombings have on local's attitude to foreign integration?

In an environment of imminent terrorist threat, this film unravels the complex attitudes people have towards ethnic minorities and the anxieties both parties have suffered since the London bombings of 7/7/05. Misconceptions and stereotypes persist as we follow one woman on her route to a job interview and the silent hostilities ash encounters as a Muslim.

Feminine, Masculine

Sadaf Foroughi

2007

Can changing Tehran's sexist segregation on buses have a wider impact on gender equality across Iran?

In the male dominated society of Iran, Farahnaz Shiri, the first female bus driver in Tehran, has made her own little society in her bus. In Iran there are different sections for men and women on public buses. But in Mrs. On Shiri's bus, everything is vice versa. In her bus, women are made to feel empowered and enjoy the privilege of freely debating their position in Iranian society. Mrs. Shiri's struggle to prove herself in this society provides a fascinating insight into gender and power in the close space of a public bus.

Finding Josephine

Tomas Sheridan

2012

Who really benefits from charitable donations?

A family has been supporting a child in Uganda via a charity for three years. The father and small daughter travel from UK to Uganda to see if their charity makes any difference: to them or to the child they are supporting.

Holiday from Poverty

Jez Lewis

2012

What does it mean to take take a holiday - when you've never had one?

Poor families might not be starving in the UK, but in a culture where most people have more than you, being poor is isolating and shaming, "People look down on you for being poor." This personal film looks at the huge difference just having a holiday can make to a family living in poverty. "They don't want money, they just want their dignity back."

In Your Hands

Lucas Nieto

2012

If you lived in the 11th most violent city in the world, what path would your life take?

Cali in Colombia is the 11th most violent city in the world. Homicide levels are high and more than 40% of the city's murders take place in the district of Aguablanca. In a place where violence is so rife and where gang membership is a way of defending your neighbourhood, what path would you take if you lived there? Good? Bad? Indifferent? As Yahir travels around Aguablanca and stops to talk to his neighbours, can you guess what path he decided to take?

Interferenze

Zoe D'Amaro

2007

What impact can a pirate radio have on Italian democracy?

Interfernze explores the intriguing story of what became known as the Telestreet network through the personal experience of the members of Orfeo TV. Operating as a pirate station, the movement aims to give the voiceless the airspace to make themselves heard. The anti-establishment campaign uses civil disobedience as a tool in the quest for democratizing Italy's airwaves.

It Started with a Duck

Sara Koppel

2016

How can ducks help women adapt to climate change?

It Started with a Duck, highlights how something as simple as a duck can advance women’s economic empowerment. Through a seemingly unlikely means, this film unpacks how women are able to play a key role in climate change adaptation and help build resilient communities.

Kinshasa 2.0

Teboho Edkins

2007

Can the internet change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world?

Kinshasa 2.0 tells the story of how the arrest of Marie-Thérèse Nlandu, a women from a prominent political family in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was publicised through the Internet and resulted in the filmmaker visting Kingshasa to see how the arrest has affected the family. This film demonstrates how the internet has the potential to change civic participation in the poorest democracies all over the world.

Maria and Osmey

Diego Arradondo

2007

What can a children's basketball game teach us about leadership and equality?

This short film tells the story of a group of Cuban children that play a baseball game in their local neighbourhood. Osmey and Maria, together with their friends, make a baseball using a deodorant can and some tape. During their match several situations arise which become conflicts that are resolved in ways only children can manage. A closer inspection of the game reveals the dynamics of participation, leadership and equality. Oblivious to events outside their game, a radio announces changes in Cuba that will one day have dramatic effects on their lives.

Miseducation

Nadine Cloete

2012

What's is like to walk to school in one of the poorest neighbourhood's in South Africa?

What's your walk to school like when, every day, you have to cross one of the poorest parts of South Africa to get to class? Kelina, aged 11, is getting an education in a township in Cape Town, riddled with guns, drugs and violence. How does she see the world on her daily trip to school?

Miss Democracy

Virginia Romero

2007

What can beauty pageants tell us about democracy?

A beauty pageant is held to decide on a Miss Democracy for 2007, and the judges are as eccentric as the contestants. The contestants subtlety reflect their country's political position and answer rounds of questions about their democracies. This humorous representation of international relations highlights the fickle nature of democracy all over the world.

My Body My Weapon

Kavita Joshi

2007

Can one women's huger strike restore justice across India?

Irom Sharmila is a young women of Manipur who has been on a hunger strike for nearly 7 years now. She has been demanding that the Indian Regional Government repeal a brutal law. The Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act is one of the drastic measures taken by the Indian Regional Government to assert their control over their territory and suppress any unrest or dissent through military means. Sharmila is willing to stake everything - even her life - to restore justice and dignity for her people.

Old Peter

Ivan Golovnev

2007

Can indigenous people preserve their culture when forced from their land?

The dialogue between people, nature and gods is based upon a sacred knowledge and mythology. In the modern world only a few cultures based on myth survive. The region of the Khanty people is the basic source of oil recovery in Russia. About 70 percent of all Rassia oil is extracted here. The oil companies actively buy huge territories in the Noth of Siberia. Indigenous people are then forced to leave these places, their own patrimonial territories, and so a modern civilization gradually absorbs an ancient culture.

On the Square

Vanja Juranic

2007

Can commemorating the Yugoslavian war allow wounds to heal?

Croatia is a small country where people like to take big vacations. Post-Yugoslavia, Croatians are dealing with battered history that many are trying to forget. But someone on the town square in Zagreb wants to remind them that wounds take time to heal. Poignantly crafted. On the square is silent reminder of a deafening issue.

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin

Contrabas Video

2016

What is the impact of the early forced marriage of girls?

One Bride, Seven Cows or a Box of Heroin weaves together stories of the forced marriage of young girls from Sudan, Vietnam and Afghanistan. The striking similarity of the girls’ experiences highlight the prevalence of this practice across the world. 

One Extra Year

Gary George Clotario

2016

Why is girls' access to education so important for gender equality?

One Extra Year uncovers the myriad of ways in staying one extra year in school benefits both the girls themselves and the wider society. Acknowledging the numerous barriers which inhibit girls continued learning, this film makes a powerful case for greater investment in girls education.

Playing the Game

Clara Kokseby & Julie Hindkjær

2016

Why is women's political participation and leadership necessary for gender equality?

In the form of an imagined letter to her Father, a woman details how systemic gender inequality excludes women from positions of power. The letter openly asks, how women can become a part of these spaces, calling on the listener to help make this possible.

Striving for Utopias

Kasper Møller Jensen & Joachim Berg Nielsen

2016

How has women's sexual liberation affected gender equality?

Striving for Utopias explains how over millennia, every society on earth has suppressed women’s sexual rights and bodily freedoms. Laying bare the insidious effects of sexist laws, this film calls for the creation of a Utopia in which women’s sexual liberation is finally realised. 

The Benefits of a Toilet

Simon Nørredam

2016

How does access to sanitation affect women and girls around the world?

The Benefits of a Toilet uses clever animation to uncover the various benefits of something the Western World takes for granted; access to a toilet. The stark inequality of access to adequate sanitation is revealed to disproportionately affects girls and women; impeding their learning, ability to work and even their safety.

The Crisis and the Sunglasses

Sean McAllister

2012

Is anyone safe from poverty?

As the European dream fades, the economic crisis brings new poverty to the people of Athens. How will they survive as their society crumbles? A man's life is destroyed by the crisis: "I don't exist anymore" he says. But a small gift makes all the difference to him and his family...

The Thread

Alicia Cano

2012

How can microcredit schemes allow young women their 'coming of age' party they deserve?

Throughout Latin America, a girl's 15th birthday marks her coming of age and is celebrated in style. It's a celebration that many poor rural families can ill-afford - the cost of the girl's dress alone is often prohibitive. Meet Blanca, a seamstress in Uruguay, who took advantage of a micro-credit scheme to invest in a sewing machine. Today she runs a business that makes and rents out affordable dresses. Now all the girls in her village can enjoy their coming of age.

Three Blind Men

Kanu Behl

2007

What lessons of resistance can be learned from India's biggest democracy?

India is the largest democracy in the world and in Delhi the capital there is a street set aside for permanent protests, Parliament Street. People converge daily to make all sorts of grand demands. Amongst the crowds, on this day, three blind men come across an elephant and while the crowds surge and shout their demands the men try to decide what the elephant is. They each experience something different – one thinks it’s a buffalo, another a wall, or is it a camel? The mahout has another point of view.

WHY PLASTIC? Trailer 2018

2018

want to eradicate plastic pollution? Become a part of our campaign today.

We're looking for filmmakers, sponsors and non-profits who want to become a part of this important campaign.

Waste

Valentin Thurn

2012

Why does the West waste so much food?

1/3 of food heads for the trash. The food thrown away in Europe and North America would be enough to feed all the hungry people in the world three times over. 3 million tones of bread are thrown away in the European Union each year.

What Ami Did Not Know

Antonio Nardella

2016

An animated film about maternal and newborn health

What Ami Did Not Know is a thought-provoking look at the prevalence of maternal mortality in developing countries. From the perspective of the new-born Ami, the inequality of access to maternal care is laid bare.

What If?

Caroline Sascha Cogez

2016

A film about girls' and women's economic empowerment

What if? poses a series of hypothetical questions, which ask how the world would be different if women were treated equally to men in the world of work. The narrator speculates that closing the gendered gaps in labour participation and wages, would lead to a fairer, wealthier and more equal society.

Advice to Men

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes give advice to men about how they can be allies in the fight for gender equality.

BBC World Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Why does poverty persist in today's world of extreme wealth?

The BBC World Debate is part of a global event hosted by the BBC and 50 other broadcasters around the world. The debate explores the causes of and cures for the enduring problem of severe poverty which still affects many people in the world. The panel is made up of: Tony Blair, former UK Prime Minister; Oby Ezekwesili from the Open Society Foundation in Africa and a former Nigerian government minister; Moeltesi Mbeki, South African author and Chair of SA Institute of International Affairs; and Vandana Shiva, Indian activist, environmentalist and scientist. The debate was chaired by Zeinab Badawi.

DR Debate: WHY POVERTY?

2012

Does foreign aid help or hinder the eradication of poverty?

Female Rolemodel

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes talk about their female role models. 

If you would give one piece of advice to men - what would it be?

2016

If you were to give one piece of advice to men– what would it be?

WHY POVERTY? Series Trailer

2012

Why Poverty? is a ground breaking, global media event, online and on TV, using films to get people talking about poverty, wealth and inequality. Together with 70 broadcasaters this campaign created the first ever global dialogue on poverty.

What challenges are women facing?

2012

Around Copenhagen, Danes reflect on the challenges women face today.

What obstacles do women face today?

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes tell us what obstacles women still face to equal treatment today.

Who is your female role model?

2016

Around Copenhagen, Danes tell us who their female role model is and why.